“Meister Eckhart: Dangerous Mystic” – Joel F. HARRINGTON

Los Angeles Review of Books, June 6, 2018 After nearly seven centuries of relative obscurity, the fourteenth-century mystic Meister Eckhart has emerged as something of a modern spiritual celebrity. Millions of Roman Catholics and other Christians have claimed the medieval German monk as one of their own, not to mention many Zen Buddhists, Sufi Muslims,… Continue lendo “Meister Eckhart: Dangerous Mystic” – Joel F. HARRINGTON

“Happy with Tears: On Melancholy as a Hungarian Condition” (Nick Loomis)

Los Angeles Review of Books, July 20, 2016 HUNGARIAN ESSAYIST László F. Földényi recently published a post on the Yale Books blog “Unbound” entitled, “Are Hungarians Melancholic?” As it happens, I’ve spent the past month ruminating over the same question, as a fellow Hungarian (half) and reader of Földényi’s newly translated (by Tim Wilkinson) book, Melancholy (1988). “Why are Hungarians sad?”… Continue lendo “Happy with Tears: On Melancholy as a Hungarian Condition” (Nick Loomis)

“Why we fail and how” – Costica BRADATAN

Los Angeles Review of Books, September 24, 2017 DIOGENES THE CYNIC (c. 412 BC–323 BC) apparently had to flee his native city of Sinope because he was caught in a scandal involving the defacement of Sinopean currency. He managed to save face, though, and switched from a failing career in counterfeiting to a more promising… Continue lendo “Why we fail and how” – Costica BRADATAN

“El filósofo del fracaso: Émile M. Cioran” (Costica Bradatan)

Originalmente publicado en inglés: The Los Angeles Book Review, 28 de noviembre, 2016. Este ensayo se incluirá en el libro En elogio del fracaso, título contratado por Harvard University Press. Traducción de María del Carmen Navarrete. Para algunos, fue uno de los pensadores más subversivos de su época, un Nietzsche del siglo XX, sólo que más sombrío y con un mejor sentido… Continue lendo “El filósofo del fracaso: Émile M. Cioran” (Costica Bradatan)

“The Philosopher of Failure: Emil Cioran’s Heights of Despair” (Costica Bradatan)

The Los Angeles Book Review, November 28, 2016 FOR SOME, he was one of the most subversive thinkers of his time — a 20th-century Nietzsche, only darker and with a better sense of humor. Many, especially in his youth, thought him to be a dangerous lunatic. According to others, however, he was just a charmingly… Continue lendo “The Philosopher of Failure: Emil Cioran’s Heights of Despair” (Costica Bradatan)